Место для логотипа

February 2018
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Яндекс.Погода

Once you have become the companion of the road, it calls you and calls you again…the road lies outside the door of your house full of charm and mystery. You want to know where the roads lead to, and what may be on them, beyond the faint horizon’s line.

 

The Golden Road to Samarkand, the Royal Road from Noble Bukhara, the Silk Roads through Transoxiana from the Ferghana Valley across the Kyzyl Kum desert to Khiva and the Khorezm oasis. Their call embraces over two millennia of travels of conquest, commerce and plain curiosity.

From the West came Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan erupted from the East, while Tamerlane made his home the heartland of Central Asia, the remarkable historical and architectural legacy inherited by modern-day Uzbekistan. Bound by sand and snow, fed by melt water from the Roof of the World, these fertile oases still attracts the travellers along the fragile threads of the Silk Road.

 

Uzbekistan

 

General Information:

 


Capital:                      

Tashkent

Language:

Uzbek

Area:

447,400 km2

Population:

27, 8 million

Religion:

Muslim majority, Russian orthodox and others

Time:

+5 hours GMT

Currency:

Su’m (UZS)

 

Uzbekistan, officially the Republic of Uzbekistan is a doubly landlocked country in Central Asia. It shares borders with Kazakhstan to the west and to the north, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan to the east, and Afghanistan and Turkmenistan to the south.

Uzbekistan has an enormous tourist potential. The country is considered one of the centres of tourism not only in Central Asia but all over the world. There are a lot of landmarks of different historical epochs in such cities as Samarkand, Bukhara, Khiva, Shakhrisabz, Kokand and Termez which were the essential part of the Great Silk Road.

There are also other attractions for foreign visitors in Uzbekistan. They are: deserts and reserves rich in various kinds of plants and animals, mountains and rivers, mineral springs that often has no analogues in the world, the tradition of applied arts and unique culture.

Wherever one treads in Uzbekistan, one follows the footprints of some of the greatest travellers in history – from Chinese pioneers seeking blood-sweating horses or enlightenment from India, to Arab scholars like ibn-Battuta, the Marco Polo of the Muslim World. To Tamerlane’s court in 1404 journeyed the Spanish ambassador Clavijo; the English merchant Jenkinson also survived the trials of Transoxiana in the 16th century.

The rich architectural inheritance of Uzbekistan is endowed with some of the most audacious buildings in the Islamic world. They are the legacy of a series of Central Asian rulers from the Turkic hordes to Tamerlane to the Khivan khans, who created breathtaking monuments to their own immortality in an attempt to leave an enduring mark on restless nomadic lands. The heavy swell of a melon dome, the graceful arch of a madrassah portal and the bold silhouette of a towering minaret from some of the most evocative images a traveller will carry away with him and sound the clearest echoes of past splendour.

Today the blues of Samarkand, the khakis of Bukhara and the greens of Khiva reflect Central Asia’s staggered architectural evolution. Samarkand offers the most spectacular, Bukhara the widest variety, Khiva the most homogeneous.